dashboard design

In businesses globally, perhaps the first and most important use of real-time analytics is seen in the IT department. Keeping all servers, and applications up and running at all times is no mean task. IT professionals rely on real-time dashboards day in and day out to help them with their time-sensitive, critical, and complex job of managing a business’s IT infrastructure.

In this post we go behind the scenes with Cleartrip, one of the leading online travel companies in India and the Middle East. We look at how they use data in the daily functioning of their business, and more specifically at how they handle payment failures.

Cleartrip’s tagline is ‘Making travel simple’ which shows in visible, and sometimes subtle ways across their user interface. However, simplicity doesn’t just happen. A lot of what seems simple in Cleartrip’s UI takes some intricate design in the background. We caught up with Ravdeep Chawla Product Manager, Analytics at Cleartrip to understand the role of analytics in their business, and how it makes their booking experience stand out from the pack.

Money Dashboard is touted as Britain’s answer to Mint.com (the most popular personal finance management app in US). It is an online application that lets you monitor, organize and take control of your money. Once authorized, it can link to all your various bank accounts, provide real-time graphical analysis of your spending, allow you to set and achieve spending goals and also set alerts. It is however, a read-only application, you cannot do any monetary transaction using Money Dashboard.

I’ve spoken in some detail about what Sift Science does in my previous post. As a quick reminder, Sift Science helps e-commerce businesses fight fraud using the power of machine learning and predictive analytics. They collect diverse data, glean signals from it, and assign a ‘Sift score’ to every user which predicts how likely it is that a particular user is a fraudster.

Over the past few weeks we’ve been discussing predictive analytics at length. We started with an overview, and then went on a tour of 9 unique businesses that are leading innovation in predictive analytics. So far, we’ve just set the stage for this and the next post, where we take a focused look at the visualization methods and concepts used in predictive analytics products today.

This first post starts with a disclaimer that it's a contrary to popular opinion on business analysis. Tim Wilson begins stating that dashboards are primarily for performance measurement, and not for recommendations. Then, he goes on to argue that business executives should expect dashboards to simply alert them to the state of their business, after which there should be a joint effort between the analyst and the recipient of the dashboard to analyze the data and decide necessary action. This way the time to take action is reduced drastically, and the outcomes are more in line with business goals.